Te Pae Oranga iwi community panels launch

By: Anne Hobby, Tumuaki

  Commissioner of Police Mike Bush, District Commander Mike Johnson, Te Piki Oranga General Manager Anne Hobby, Te Piki Oranga Chair Jane Du Feu; Assistant Commissioner Wallace Haumaha, and Honourable Stuart Nash Minister of Police

Commissioner of Police Mike Bush, District Commander Mike Johnson, Te Piki Oranga General Manager Anne Hobby, Te Piki Oranga Chair Jane Du Feu; Assistant Commissioner Wallace Haumaha, and Honourable Stuart Nash Minister of Police

Te Piki Oranga, in partnership with Tasman Police launched Te Pae Oranga: Iwi Community Panels for the Tasman district at Whakatū Marae 16 May 2018. This follows successful pilot programmes in Lower Hutt, Gisborne, and Counties Manukau in recent years. Effective interventions at the interface between the criminal justice system and health systems have the potential to make a significant impact on Hauora Māori. There is poorer health among those people who are unsafe, insecure, unemployed or in low-control and poorly paid jobs (Shaw et al 1999). This includes the justice system where high arrest and conviction rates contribute to Maori unemployment (Hunter 2005).

Te Pae Oranga see justice sector agencies and the community working together to reduce reoffending, by offering alternate solutions to address lower-level offending other than going directly into the court system. Te Piki Oranga will facilitate the panel and support services. Iwi of the rohe and community groups have been invited to put forward people who are well connected to their community and have the skills to participate on the panel. Police are providing training to panel members.

video courtesy of: Tairawhiti Production House Ltd

People facing low-level offences such as shoplifting or disorder which would have a penalty of less than six months in prison could be referred to the panel by a police officer. The panel would then look at ensuring the participant was accountable for their actions, but importantly that any underlying causes of the behaviours are addressed to help rehabilitation, prevent future offending and support that person to become a productive member of the community. For example there is good evidence for alternative approaches to reduce recidivism for people with underlying alcohol and drug issues and those involved in less serious crime (Ministry of Health 2007). Victims also are an important part of the process.   

  Sergeant Erin Hurley, Maori Responsiveness Manager Dexter Traill and Anne Hobby

Sergeant Erin Hurley, Maori Responsiveness Manager Dexter Traill and Anne Hobby

  Te Pou Taki Sonny Alesana and Board Member Kereopa Ratapu

Te Pou Taki Sonny Alesana and Board Member Kereopa Ratapu

Low level offenders get chance to face up to peers rathen than courts

by Katy Jones, Stuff

"Bad people who do bad things need to be in a certain place. But there are people who are not bad who do bad things, and there are interventions that we can put in place to ensure they get their lives back on track," Police Commissioner Mike Bush told those gathered for the launch at Nelson's Whakatu Marae.

Read more by following the link below on Stuff.co.nz

https://www.stuff.co.nz/nelson-mail/news/103869002/low-level-offenders-get-chance-to-face-up-to-peers-rather-than-courts

  Dayveen Stephens leads Police Assistant Commissioner Wally Haumaha, left, Police Commissioner Mike Bush, Honourable Minister of Police Stuart Nash, Nelson police Inspector Ian McKenzie, carrying Te Pae Oranga, and Sergeant Wayne Panapa on to Whakatū Marae for the launch of the region's Te Pae Oranga Community/Iwi Panels.

Dayveen Stephens leads Police Assistant Commissioner Wally Haumaha, left, Police Commissioner Mike Bush, Honourable Minister of Police Stuart Nash, Nelson police Inspector Ian McKenzie, carrying Te Pae Oranga, and Sergeant Wayne Panapa on to Whakatū Marae for the launch of the region's Te Pae Oranga Community/Iwi Panels.

Te Manu Aute o te Piki Oranga - The Kite of Te Piki Oranga

  Kereopa Ratapu

Kereopa Ratapu

by Kereopa Ratapu, Board Member

Te Manu Aute is a traditional Māori design for a kite, a form of traditional Māori flying craft. These traditional patterns and designs were used in our weaving and carving crafts and including hand string games used by our ancestors.

Construction materials used to make a Manu Aute were stems of the Toetoe (Cortaderia plant) and other various native plant materials.

  Te Manu Aute

Te Manu Aute

The Tohunga (experts of traditional Māori Wānanga) used this instrument to provide clear direction or to find objects that had been misplaced and as a form of communication from village to village.

It is an absolute beautiful craft to engage with and very inspiring when flying one of these Manu Aute and so your dreams can soar into the heavens where the Atua dwelt. Therefore, your health aspirations will soar with this Manu Aute to inspire the health needs of your whānau living in Te Tau Ihu.

Ngā mihi manawa ora kia koutou kātoa.

Na Kereopa Ratapu

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Māori Tikanga Wananga ... a great way to re-connect with Tikanga and kawa

by Eugene Wikitera

  Eugene Wikitera in the middle led the mau rākau/taiha

Eugene Wikitera in the middle led the mau rākau/taiha

Ko Tainui te waka
Ko Waikato te awa
Ko Rangitoto te maunga
Ko Ngāti Maniapoto te iwi
Ko Rereahu te hapu
Ko Aharoa te marae
Ko Anderson taku whanau
No Te Kuiti ahau

Ka whai e au Manganui a te Ao
Ki tōku turuturu ki te kotihitihi o te Kahui Maunga.
Marama te titiro ki te Ao karere mai nei,
Mai Te Puru ki Tuhua ki te Matapihi,
mai te Kahui Maunga ki Tai.
Ka rere kau mai te awa nei,
Ko au te awa, ko te awa ko au

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Ruapehu te maunga
Ko te Turi o Murimotu te taumata
Whanganui te awa
Aotea te waka
Te Atihaunui a Paparanginui te iwi
Ngāti Rangi te hapu
Tuhiariki te Marae
Ko Paerangi ahau

Ko Eugene taku ingoa

 

 

Kia ora my name is Eugene Wikitera and I would like to share a little about me and my experience being involved with Maori Tikanga Wananga run by Te Piki Oranga in partnership with New Zealand Corrections.

Firstly, a brief description of myself; I lost my way as a teen doing little crimes up until the age of 18. A violent past saw me in jail for 10 years of my now 38 years. Since going to jail in 1998, it was also the last time I would see any family. The loss of those years made adjusting to a modern-day society very hard with the new fast paced lifestyle, other than the routine of a prison regime. I will have been out of jail for 10 years this September. The previous ten years have not been easy with minor charges resulting in three sentences, which gave me the opportunity to attend the Maori Tikanga Wananga run by Te Piki Oranga.

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I have always been proud to be Māori. I was brought up with stories of my ancestors and morals taught to me by my elders. I made bad choices and the Māori Tikanga Wananga that Te Piki Oranga provide is a great way to re-connect with tikanga and kawa. The course for me gave me back what I had lost so long ago which was my identity. A proud Māori with a sense of belonging.

I have recently attended the Maori Tikanga Wananga held at Waikawa Marae but this time as a kaiako (tutor). The opportunity that I have been given by Te Piki Oranga and especially their Pou Taki, Sonny Alesana to share my mau rākau/taiaha skills and my life story with participants. I hope my story and experience will inspire others to make changes in their lives. I know that I am not a teacher but experiences that I have picked up in the Maori Tikanga Wananga has given me a positive outlook for the future.

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Letter from the Library (Hoodrats)

letter from Jessie Dredge

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To Te Piki Oranga,

On behalf of all the kids that hang out at the library, I would like to thank Tanya and her awesome sister Debs for taking time out of their work days to drive us to Whenua Iti Outdoors.

The challenges that we took part in really made us think as a team and we all enjoyed it thoroughly. After the first activity we returned to the main meeting area and there was an abundance of great food laid out for us which included chickens, fresh fruits and bread as well as refreshing water.

The day we had was better than anything we could have done that day (other than annoy the ladies at the library and Dave the security guard).

 
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Tanya and Debbie Tauwhare of Te Piki Oranga took the time out of their normal work to have awesome time with the rangatahi at Whenua Iti Outdoors

We all very much appreciate what Tanya does for us. Every day she has a range of nice food for us all to chow down on and sometimes a sweet treat as well and water. This woman really needs a pay rise, seriously she’s amazing.

So thank you very much for allowing Tanya to take us on an adventure and we look forward to the next one.

From all of us at the library (Hoodrats)

Jessie Dredge

  Tanya Tauwhare of Te Piki Oranga loves feeding the rangatahi at the library with some healthy kai.

Tanya Tauwhare of Te Piki Oranga loves feeding the rangatahi at the library with some healthy kai.

  An abundance of great food laid out for rangatahi which included chicken, fresh fruits and bread as well as refreshing water.

An abundance of great food laid out for rangatahi which included chicken, fresh fruits and bread as well as refreshing water.

  Sausage on fresh bread with tomato sauce ... yum!

Sausage on fresh bread with tomato sauce ... yum!

  Hoodrats at the library enjoying free food after school. What a treat!

Hoodrats at the library enjoying free food after school. What a treat!

Ngā Puna Rangatira

by Sonny Alesana, Te Pou Taki / Cultural Advisor

Facilitators: Te Ao Pritchard (Nga Puhi, Ngati Kahu and Samoa) and Tricia Keelan (Te Aupouri and Ngāti Porou)

  Te Ao Pritchard

Te Ao Pritchard

MĀTĀPUNA – Mātāpuna is the source of our rangatiratanga and aligns with TUPUNA. This puna  explores our source of inspiration for our leadership.

MĀPUNA -  Māpuna manifests in the ripples we are creating in the world now. In this puna, we delve into our roles and what changes/difference are we making in the lives of our whānau, hapu, iwi and the hapori (wider community)?

PUNA TOROTĪ  - The Puna Torotī represents the legacy we leave our MOKOPUNA. Puna Torotī probes our thinking around  our ability to inspire others. What is it that we want people to learn from us?

  Tricia Keelan

Tricia Keelan

There are many different understandings and perspectives on Rangatiratanga, these include ‘the leader’, ‘leading by going in advance', ‘guiding behaviour', ‘inducing, directing, and inspiring'.

The training explored the view that regardless of who we are as individual or tangata whenua, we all have a valuable contribution to make, and part to play in whanau, hapu and iwi hauora (wellbeing).

It celebrates both the diversity and unity of our spiritual, mental, physical, and emotional experiences. The individual is located as part of whanau and the developmental aspects of the framework was explored through the lenses of Kaiwhakaataata – self reflect, Kaimahi – Interaction and Kaituitui weaving resources and people together.

The training presented many of us with challenges, it also provides Te Piki Oranga with a platform to explore future training opportunities to support our kaimahi and our whānau.

  Sonny Alesana signalling kaimahi to return to the marae.

Sonny Alesana signalling kaimahi to return to the marae.

  Kaimahi singing "Io, Io" waiata inside the wharekai.

Kaimahi singing "Io, Io" waiata inside the wharekai.

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Shot Bro: A kōrero of hope

by Amber Ford, Pūkenga Atawhai / NetP Nurse

  Rob Mokaraka with Te Piki Oranga kaimahi Amber Ford, Karen Davidson, Alice Adair and Lydia Mains

Rob Mokaraka with Te Piki Oranga kaimahi Amber Ford, Karen Davidson, Alice Adair and Lydia Mains

SHOT BRO is more than a show... it is theatre for social change. A Black Comedy about Rob Mokaraka's real life battle with his depression and a bullet. Its aim is to provide all communities with an internal perspective on mental health and depression in a safe way. Mauri ora.

Rob was in the news in 2009 when he was shot by a policeman after a suicidal depressive episode. He survived and is now a respected actor and playwright who has been touring a one-man show called Shot Bro: Confessions of a Depressed Bullet – which is witty, funny, dark, and above all spreads the message that there is a way out of the darkness.

In late March, Motueka kaimahi supported whanau to attend the play and provided an interactive information table to help tautoko the event.  The show at times, was very confronting but all agreed this was a relevant and critical conversation to be had among the community. Rob did a phenomenal portrayal of what is a very real reality for many whanau and although hard hitting for viewers, it was also very encouraging as Rob shared ultimately, a korero of hope.

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  Motueka community watches Rob Mokaraka's sweaty show number 5 of Shot Bro

Motueka community watches Rob Mokaraka's sweaty show number 5 of Shot Bro

Casual racism inspires young nurse's commitment to Māori healthcare

by Paula Hulburt, Stuff

  Te Piki Oranga nurse Rosie Mackie was inspired to work in the Māori health sector after witnessing casual racism first hand.

Te Piki Oranga nurse Rosie Mackie was inspired to work in the Māori health sector after witnessing casual racism first hand.

A moment of casual racism from a healthcare professional helped Te Piki Oranga Pūkenga Atawhai/Community Health Nurse Rosie Mackie decide she wanted to specialise in Māori community health.

Read more by following link below on stuff.co.nz.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/103635026/casual-racism-inspires-young-nurses-commitment-to-mori-healthcare

Motueka Cancer Kōrero 2018

by Gloria Eggeling, Pūkenga Manaaki / Whānau Navigator

  Eddie Blackburn, one of our whanau who talked via video link was with Gloria Eggeling .   

Eddie Blackburn, one of our whanau who talked via video link was with Gloria Eggeling.

 

What an amazing night we had in Motueka on the 17th May to discuss and support whānau with knowledge and kōrero on a very difficult subject, "cancer".

We started the evening with a karakia by Uncle Tahi Takao who filled in very gracefully as Uncle Andy was unable to attend through being unwell.

We were then entertained by the Te Kapa Haka o Te Āwhina Marae group who are currently getting ready for the regional competitions in Nelson. There was some amazing harmonies and beautiful waiata which we enjoyed.

We also had the group Sylo perform in the second half of the programme and some of these whānau were well in their 80’s. Awesome fun and great old favourite songs. This group gets together weekly in Tokomaru and is part of a group of people with compromised breathing and has numbers of almost 30 members supported by the District Nurses.

Te Kapa Haka o Te Āwhina Marae

We had several guest speakers, Melissa Cragg discussed the Cancer Pathways in context to Māori with the recent statistics released in a presentation by Dr. Jason Gurney from Victoria University who reported on the statistics for Māori and the population ratio for the different types of cancer.

Angela Briggs and Kylie from Breast Screening Aotearoa discussed the breast screening programme and outlined what a mammogram involves and the expected changes to them raising the age to 70 years.

Michelle Hunt from the Cancer Society discussed the services offered in Nelson and Motueka, the funding and the programmes that they run to support survivors of cancer. Also how they support whānau who have to travel outside the region for radiology, with accommodation, travel and all sorts of supported help during and after treatment.

  Michelle Hunt from Nelson Cancer Society gave an awesome presentation on their community programme and support for whanau.

Michelle Hunt from Nelson Cancer Society gave an awesome presentation on their community programme and support for whanau.

  The arrangement represents the whanau with TPO walking alongside the change of seasons the cycle of life. The birds represents whanau taking their own health in hand and become independent .

The arrangement represents the whanau with TPO walking alongside the change of seasons the cycle of life. The birds represents whanau taking their own health in hand and become independent .

  Nuki Takao spoke to our whanau about her experiences with cancer and her journey and recovery.

Nuki Takao spoke to our whanau about her experiences with cancer and her journey and recovery.

Harry George Eddie Nuki: Ki te kotahi te kākaho ka whati, Ki te kāpuia e kore e whati.
— Alone we can be broken, standing together we are invincible.

The next part of the programme was ”whānau stories”. These whānau shared their personal journeys by video link or spoke live to the audience. I can only speak from my perspective; the stories they shared were sad, inspiring, personal and very very moving. Thank you whānau you really touched a lot of people's hearts.

In the second half, Miraka Norgate spoke about the Quit smoking programme and support for whānau in the region. There were a lot of handouts given out to whānau.

Janice and Gillian spoke about the new Bowel Screening programme in Nelson and how they make the selections on who was going to be screened and how to do this process. Most people thought the bowel screen was much easier than anticipated and ”very simple they say.”

Cushla Arnott from District Nursing spoke about their role as Palliative Care nurses in the community supporting cancer and the Hospice home care.

Carla Arkless talked about Advance Care Planning (ACP)  on the importance of writing down what you want in the eventuality of health crisis or death. She showed a great whānau video on ACP to conclude the evening.

Tane Ora to the rescue!!!

by Emz Schwass, Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMHS) Clinician

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One of my lads  - Temaire, fell off his bike and did some damage to both himself and his bike. We are very fortunate that in situations like this we are only a phone call away to our very reliable Blair Carpenter facilitator of Te Piki Oranga Tane Ora group to come to the rescue!!!

In no time the bike was fixed with a new bike tyre, straightened wheel, oiled chain, improved front gears  and a cleaned, polished and shined bike.

Blair tested the bike before returning it and Temaire took off uphill with ease with the brand new gears!

 
  Blair Carpenter aka "Super Tane" to the rescue!!!

Blair Carpenter aka "Super Tane" to the rescue!!!

  Temaire taking off with his improved bike.

Temaire taking off with his improved bike.

Nau mai, haere mai ngā Kaimahi hou!

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We are happy to welcome all our new kaimahi (staff) profiled below who started or got promoted this quarter across the rohe. We are pleased with the calibre of our kaimahi who will be adding more enthusiasm and expertise to our organisation.

We also welcome back at our Whakatū whare; Stacy Currin-Steer, Kaimahi-a-Iwi (Social Worker) who rejoined us at the end of her maternity leave and Janos Araneta, Pūkenga Atawhai (Community Nurse) who is our first nurse working for us as a casual. We are keen to recruit more casual nurses to ensure any shortfall can be supported from a casual pool.

 
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Ko Ururau te waka
Ko Tutoko te mauka
Ko Makaawhio te awa
Ko Kati Mahaki te hapu
Ko Kai Tahu te iwi
Ko Te Tauraka Waka a Maui te marae
No Taipotini ahau
Ko Ian Davidson tōku tane
Ko Joel raua ko Tuiana oku tamariki

Ko Karen Davidson ahau.
 
As a young 18-year-old, I left  home and went to Hokitika to start my career in health as a hospital aide. After 1 year I started and completed my enrolled Nurse training in Greymouth, then transferred back to Reefton Hospital to work.

I married and had my children while continuing to work at the Reefton Hospital.

In 1998 I had the opportunity to study  with UCOL to become a Registered Nurse, I graduated in 2000 with a Bachelor of Nursing.

I have had the privilege since 2000 to work as a Community Whānau Nurse in the Inangahua District, then came up to Whakatū Marae and worked as a Whānau Ora Nurse for 1 year.

In 2010 Ian and I made the decision to cross the ditch and had a 6 month contract with Northern Territory (NT) Government as the Barkly Mobile Nurse, servicing 8 cattle stations 4 days every month.

While in Tennant Creek after being the Barky Mobile Nurse, I held the position as the Continuous Quality Improvement facilitator for Anyinginyi Aboriginal Health Corporation and the NT Government. I had 5 remote aboriginal clinics and 1 large urban facility to support for Audits and Quality improvement.

I was based in the Anyinginyi Health Clinic and become the nurse manager of the Health Centre, it was a large facility with 13 consult rooms and 32 staff with other external services.

Needless to say, my 6 months contract had now extended to 6 years living in the red centre of central Australia supporting aboriginal health.

2016, I had become increasingly homesick for New Zealand and wanted to relocate back to Nelson where 5 of my 7 siblings and my daughter were living.

I was delighted to apply and get a position as Pūkenga Manaaki with Te Piki Oranga, however in the transit back to NZ I was fortunate that a position came up in Motueka as a Pūkenga Atawhai.

Thank you to the team and Lydia for repatriating me back to New Zealand, you're an awesome team to be part of.

I am very exciting to be taking up the position as Pūkenga Kaiwhakahaere at Whakatū and look forward to leading the team.

Manaaki Whenua, Manaaki Tangata Haere whakamua.

 

 

Ko Whitireia te maunga
Ko Raukawa to moana
Ko Tainui te waka
Ko Ngāti Toa te Iwi
Ko Ngāti Koata, Ngāti Tama me Ngāti Rarua nga Iwi.

Tēnā koutou katoa, my name is Karina Hippolite and I’m the new Oral Health Promoter for Te Piki Oranga. I have been a Dental Assistant for many years working with school dental, community dental for Ora Toa in Porirua. Looking forward to meeting with you all.

 

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Ko Puhungatohoro te maunga
Ko Omapere te Roto
Ko ngā Tokimatawhaorua te waka
Ko Ngāpuhi te Iwi
Ko Ngati Tautahi te hapu
Ko Okorihi te Marae
No Tai Tokorau ahau.

Ko Marissa Scott tōku ingoa.

Kia Ora Koutou!

I have lived in Whakatū and Waimeha most of my life.I completed my bachelor of nursing 12 years ago, and over the years I have gained experience in many different areas nursing. Last year I lived in Australia where I worked as a Primary District Nurse and although I enjoyed my job and loved meeting many diverse cultures I felt so disconnected and far away from my own and so here I am at Te Piki Oranga and what an awesome team to be part of!!

Having had 3 tamariki with the youngest being 18, I am taking a journey of self-discovery and I’m looking forward to the many challenges I will face as I learn more Tikanga Māori.

One thing is certain for me and that is when I’m with whānau, I feel connected and grounded and I can work not only with the knowledge I’ve gained over the years but wholeheartedly from my heart.

 

Mate ngakau aroha koe e aarahi
— Let a loving heart guide your decisions.
 
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Ko Carter Stormann tōku ingoa.

Greetings! My name is Carter Stormann. I am a new Pūkenga Atawhai in Whakatū. I am originally from the United States but recently became a proud NZ citizen. I have spent the last 7 years as a practice nurse in Nelson and am very happy to have made the shift to community nursing as this is where my heart has always been. I am currently studying a Masters of Nursing at Massey University with the goal of gaining registration as a Nurse Practitioner.

I look forward to new opportunities to engage with whanau and grow as a practitioner.

 

Tēnā koutou katoa!

Ko Hikurangi te maunga
Ko Wiapu te awa
Ko Ngati Porou te iwi
Ko Ohine Wiapu te Marae
Ko Ricky Carr ahau.

I am of Ngāti Porou descent and I currently reside in Clyde, Central Otago. I have a lifestyle block in Galloway carrying sixty sheep and seven beef cattle. My partner and I have a blended family of five adult children spread throughout Aotearoa, Australia and the United States. I have travelled extensively through Europe, UK, Japan, USA, the Pacific and Australia. I particularly enjoy fly fishing, golf, basketball and cooking.

I have experience in community health, social and education services in New Zealand over the last 20 years. I have worked in the funding and planning sectors in health and social services and have been leading primary health and social services for rural Māori in the Central Lakes district providing whanau ora, mauri ora services and mobile primary health clinics across the district at remote locations. I am a former member of the Southern District Health Board Māori Management Advisory group.

I have had direct involvement with the development of Te Putahitanga Whanau Ora commissioning agency based in Christchurch.

Good relationships are critical to the success of all human endeavours. It is my understanding that great relationships are an essential building block for any organisation to provide exceptional services, to develop a culture of a supportive infrastructure that empowers kaimahi to function at their optimum.

 

To celebrate that most people and places are smokefree

by Sonia Hepi-Treanor, Te hā Pūkenga Manaaki / Stop Smoking Navigator

Join the trend - become smokefree

  Sonia Hepi-Treanor with Jo Delany (Smokefree Administrator) and Miraka Norgate (Health Promoter Smokefree, NMH) at Fresh Choice.

Sonia Hepi-Treanor with Jo Delany (Smokefree Administrator) and Miraka Norgate (Health Promoter Smokefree, NMH) at Fresh Choice.

More and more New Zealanders are not smoking or giving up smoking – a very welcome trend! The most recent tobacco-use figures show 84%[1] of New Zealanders do not smoke. That’s 4% more than in 2008, so we are moving towards the Govenment’s goal of a smokefree Aotearoa in 2025.

I believe it’s also great to see so many younger people not taking up smoking. Now, 96% of 15 to 17 year olds are smokefree[2], which is a marked increase from 84% 10 years earlier. It’s critical we keep encouraging young New Zealanders to stay smokefree.

I’m also very pleased to see more New Zealanders support expanding smokefree environments. A recent health and lifestyle survey[3] showed nearly 94% of us believe smoking in cars with children should be banned. Also, 79% believe smoking should be banned in all outdoor dining and 81% say the same for outdoor public waiting areas. While 84% want smoking banned within five metres of entrances to public buildings.

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Local authorities and businesses are taking notice of changing attitudes towards smoking. Increasing numbers of councils are declaring public places, spaces and events to be smokefree, including outdoor eating spaces. More and more businesses are going totally smokefree.

Stopping smoking is really tough, but doing it with our support helps. That can include face-to-face coaching, along with free nicotine replacement therapy. We can create a plan to manage cravings, and strategies to avoid situations where you would usually smoke.

We see from the work we do at Te Piki Oranga, positive action around being smokefree is snowballing, creating an Aotearoa where being smokefree is the normal way of life. Having fewer people who smoke around you, and having the smokefree attitude continuously reinforced, means it’s easier to give up smoking. Crucially, poeple are also less likely to start using tobacco.

May 31 is World Smokefree Day so it’s the ideal time to celebrate our country’s smokefree successes. We can have a smokefree Aotearoa by 2025 if we work together to help our friends, whānau and workmates become smokefree.

For more information about becoming smokefree contact Brenda Chilvers (Wairau/Blenheim) or Sonia Hepi-Treanor (Whakatū/Nelson) on 0800 672 642.

  Miraka and Jo showing a trolley filled with $140 worth of groceries, equivalent to the average weekly spend of NZ smoker.

Miraka and Jo showing a trolley filled with $140 worth of groceries, equivalent to the average weekly spend of NZ smoker.

 Sonia and Jo outside Victory Pharmacy.

Sonia and Jo outside Victory Pharmacy.

 

[1] Health Promotion Agency 2017. NZ Health and Lifestyle Survey 2016.

[2] Ministry of Health, The New Zealand Health Survey 2016/17.

[3] Health Promotion Agency 2017. NZ Health and Lifestyle Survey 2016.

Why have a FREE heart and diabetes check?

by Sarah Satherley, Primary Health Manager and Glenis Bell, Health Promotion Manager of Nelson Bays Primary Health

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It could save your life as early detection is your best protection.

  • To check to see if you have diabetes
  • To see what your risk of having a heart attack or stroke is in the next five years
  • Then discuss what you can do to keep well and reduce any risks identified

 Who can have a FREE heart and diabetes check?

Those that haven’t had a Heart and Diabetes check in the last 5 years and meet the criteria below:

  • Maori, Pacific Men from 35 to 74 years or other (low income) Men from 45 to 74
  • Maori, Pacific Woman from 45 to 74 years or other (low income) Woman from 55 to 74

 Not sure if this is you, It’s OK to ask.

Phone your family doctor to check and they can book you in if you need one.

Buck Shelford joins fight against heart disease and diabetes

  Buck Shelford

Buck Shelford

Former All Black Wayne 'Buck' Shelford is joining the fight against heart disease and diabetes in New Zealand.

The former rugby star - who was a member of the 1987 Rugby World Cup Champion All Black team - is encouraging Kiwis to get their heart and diabetes checked.

"Every 90 minutes a New Zealander dies from heart disease. And every day many people are diagnosed with diabetes or pre-diabetes.

"A heart and diabetes check gives you information on how to reduce your risk of having a heart attack or stroke, and it will diagnose early signs of diabetes" he said.

"It will let you know what your risk is and, more importantly, the best strategies for you to improve your health"

There is a team at home relying on you, so please, be there for your team!

Holistic approach to all aspects of health

by Miraka Norgate, Health Promoter Smokefree, Nelson Marlborough Health

  Miraka Norgate

Miraka Norgate

Tēnā koutou katoa:

Ka tū ahau I runga tōku maunga Ko Maungataniwha
Ka titiro whakararo ki tōku awa e rere nei Ko Tapapa
I hoea mai ōku tupuna I tōku waka Ko Ngatokimatawhaorua
He uri ahau no te Iwi o Te Taitokerau.
Ka noho piritahi toku iwi I toku marae ko Ngapuhi
Ko Reihana taku ingoa whānau
Ko Norgate taku ingoa marena
Ko Miraka ahau.

He mihi nui tēnei kia koe te Tumuaki o Te Piki Oranga Anne Hobby, for inviting me to contribute a kōrero for the June pānui.

I’m a Smokefree Health Promoter for Public Health and I hold a designated Māori role which comes under our Māori General Manager Ditre Tamatea, Te Waka Hauora, (within the NMH).

As a Health Promoter I work district wide, moving comfortably within our communities, Iwi, Maata Waka, Te Waka Hauora, Maori Providers, Marae, Kohanga Reo, Kura Kaupapa, Nelson Bays Primary Health, schools and colleges. I also work with our church organisations such as St. Vincent de Paul, Red Cross and Salvation Army.

Working collaboratively within our community certainly gives me a wide scope to promote and present our kaupapa Auahi Kore to our whanau/community who are then supported from our Cessation Practitioners within Te Piki Oranga and across Te Tau Ihu. We have our Cessation Practitioners in both our hospitals, they work tirelessly to achieve our Ministry of Health (MOH) targets. 

IF ANYONE REQUIRES ANY SUPPORT Contact 0800 667 665

The benefits include:

  • Intensive one on one support with a quit coach.
  • Home visits, workplace support and community clinics.
  • Nicotine replacement therapy.
  • Information about other quit smoking products and services; and
  • A complementary approach to the Quit line service that offers 24/7 support.

 Pēpi first programme is also offered to our Hapū (pregnant Mum’s)

The benefits include:

  • Vouchers to reward your progress
  • Intensive one-on one support with a Quit Coach.
  • Home visits workplace support and community clinics.
  • Nicotine replacement therapy
  • Information about other quit smoking products and services; and
  • A complementary approach to the Quit line service that offers 24/7 support.

To bring this collaborative mahi together as a Smokefree health promoter, I believe it gives me the opportunity to promote holistic approach to all aspects of health, such as cervical smears, breast screening, vaccinations, oral health, healthy eating, healthy homes and exercise. Once the promotion aspect of my role is completed, referrals are made to the appropriate partners. "Ko mutu taku mahi". (My job is complete.)

No reira I te Tumuaki tēnā koe, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa.

Hei kona!

Sadly, we have to say goodbye to a few kaimahi this quarter. We wish them all the very best for their future whether they were moving to a new job, or having well-deserved time off for their wellness, or moving overseas or reuniting with their families due to illness. Hei kona ra!

Kaimahi ki Wairau:

  • Ripeka Houkamau, Pūkenga Kaiwhakahaere (Site Manager)
  • Brad Inobio, Pūkenga Atawhai (Community Nurse)
  • Jessica Foster, Pūkenga Atawhai (Community Nurse)
  • Fawad Shah, Alcohol & Other Drug Clinician
  • Gaylene Te Hore, Pūkenga Manaaki (Whānau Navigator)

Kaimahi ki Whakatū:

  • Michelle Edwards, Pūkenga Kaiwhakahaere (Site Manager)
  • Tania Penaia-Ryan, Pūkenga Atawhai (Community Nurse)
  • Roberta Simpkins, Kaimahi-a-Iwi (Social Worker)
  Brad Inobio (right) with Janos Araneta and Rossana Rogers at his poroake.

Brad Inobio (right) with Janos Araneta and Rossana Rogers at his poroake.

  Lunch at Fairweather's for Ripeka Houkamau poroake.

Lunch at Fairweather's for Ripeka Houkamau poroake.

  Rossana Rogers helping Ripeka Houkamau with her new scarf.

Rossana Rogers helping Ripeka Houkamau with her new scarf.

  Ripeka having a giggle after once we've figured how to put her scarf on.

Ripeka having a giggle after once we've figured how to put her scarf on.

  Anne Hobby giving Michelle Edwards her taonga.

Anne Hobby giving Michelle Edwards her taonga.

  A tearful but thankful Michelle Edwards at her poroake.

A tearful but thankful Michelle Edwards at her poroake.

 F awad Shah and the team at Blenheim/Wairau on his last day at Te Piki Oranga and New Zealand.

Fawad Shah and the team at Blenheim/Wairau on his last day at Te Piki Oranga and New Zealand.